Sunday, March 6, 2011

Said The Spider To The Fly

We have some very unique places to shoot in our studio, being that it is a nearly 100 year old abandoned factory.  One of those places is an old tool-crib.  For those of you that don't know, a tool crib is where factory employees can beg for expensive tools at a service window in order to do their job properly.  The goal of the crib is accountability for that costly saw and its expected return when the worker is done hacking things in half. 

However, all this tool crib has to offer these days is a plethora of spiderwebs!  Yup, and along with those webs come a ton of the little creepy workers as well.  In some places they are so thick they are almost opaque.  I guess that is what you get with 20 or so years of letting them run the place.

We do rent the studio if you are ever in the Milwaukee/Racine area, please let me know and we can make some arrangements for you to test your arachnophobia.

Posing The Model
The model today is actually one of the hair dressers I had with me, but because all of the models were making squeeling noises, she volunteered to be in the shot.

Basically I was looking for something that really worked the creepy factor.  Lots of poses come to mind, and I am sure I will get in more shots of this space in the future.  I was actually there this weekend, but we decided to play in an old power room filled with valves and forgo this for a day when the model isn't making high-pitched noises at the thought of entering the room.

This pose was a "come here" type of pose.  Because she had on a little-girl type of dress, we went with it reminiscent of something one might see in The Shining.  I would like to note that this room is HUGE, in there are probably 8 halls like the one in the image, so I am not really doing the space any favors with this tight crop, but then the space is holding the subject, not the other way around.

Lighting The Scene
In this case, I used a ƒ2.8 24-70mm lens (racked out to 70mm) and mounted this on a tripod.  The overhead lights were plenty bright and the "raccoon" under the eyes we normally try and avoid is making my neck-hairs stand on end, so we went with it and didn't add anything else.  Yes, the model had to stand damn still, but I think the exposure was around 1/30, so very attainable without pushing ISO up very far (I avoid that at all costs).

Post Production & Photoshop
OK, now is where the fun begins.

The initial image isn't bad, and that is always the goal of course.  If you can shoot it, do so.  Don't use the "well, I will just fix that in Photoshop" excuse if you don't have to.  No one likes additional work later when you can take a moment and fix it at the point it is taken.

My first issue is always color balance and I am looking for something on the *old* side, so yellow it will be.  Adding a huge adjustment layer we can mess with this color as often as we feel the need as we continue to develop this creepy visage.

The model didnt' really have any cosmetic issues, and from this distance if she did they would not be readily visible anyway.  We can pretty much blow past that and get onto the lighting.

The image is under exposed as far as I am concerned.  The center point of the image is of course our pretty lady and we really need to get her up to snuff.  The easiest and most non-destructive method to fix this to do this is a curve adjustment layer set to the screen blending mode.  I could have increased the ISO to get the proper exposure, but I also would have done damage to the exposed areas where now I have more control.  In the end the image will be textured anyway, but at least I can make decisions about what I want blow out. 
This curve-screen method is my favorite because it does not increase the image size as much as a copy of the layer set to screen.  Plus we also get the benefit of the curve in case we want to adjust the overall adjustment.

Once that layer is in place I might go in and mask out areas that are overly bright.  Remember a mask can be added to about any layer and is automatically put in place for adjustment layers.  Just paint black on the mask and it will block out the effect from that area.  You can also paint shades of gray if you only want a partial effect as well.  In this case I had a 20% black brush and painted on the mask over areas to remove the effect (darken), and in some cases I would go over an area several times.

Next I wanted to add a texture to add some age as well as another level of detail.  Again, if you don't already own The Fly Paper Textures, just go get them now.  I can't tell you how often I use these, and many of my future images also utilize one or multiple images from this awesome set.

I choose one of the textures from the set and set it to overlay blending mode.  I then used the mask on that layer to remove the texture from areas like the models face.  I also took the dodge and burn brushes and proceeded to bring out more of the concrete texture on the floor.  The area behind the model was also lightened to "bring her forward" and increase the contrast and focus for the overall image.

Questions, comments, witticisms, criticizes, heresies, or fallacies?  Please leave me a comment.